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What the General Election Could Mean For Employment Law

The snap General Election has been all over the news since its announcement.  Debates, Party broadcasts and campaigns has been prevalent for weeks now.  With that in mind, we thought we’d bring you our key observations of what the result could mean for employment law based on party manifestos.  

Conservatives

  • The National Living Wage (NLW) will rise “in line with average earnings by 2020”.  The Conservatives are committed to the NLW increasing to 60% of median hourly earnings, estimated to be around £8.75.
  • A statutory right to a year’s unpaid leave to care for a relative.
  • The protection of employment rights during the Brexit process.
  • Cut net migration to “tens of thousands” in line with David Cameron’s pledge in the 2010 manifesto.
  • Two weeks paid leave for parents whose child has died.
  • A proposal to remove the requirement for workers to have suffered from a mental health condition for at least 12 month before gaining protection as a disabled person under the Equality 2010.
  • Personal income tax allowance increase to £12,500.

Labour

  • The National Living Wage would increase to “at least” £10 per hour by 2020 and would be extended to all those aged 18 and over.
  • The introduction of four new public holidays, one for each patron saints’ days.
  • A pledge to ensure public sector workers receive pay rises in line with inflation by ending the 1% pay cap on public sector pay rises.
  • Proposals to scrap Employment Tribunal fees. 
  • To give all workers equal rights from day one of employment, whether they are permanent, temporary, full or part-time workers.
  • A ban on the use of zero hours’ contracts and unpaid internships.
  • A proposal to scrap the “worker” employment status, meaning workers would receive exactly the same rights as all employees.
  • A review of redundancy entitlements, with a view to potentially increasing statutory redundancy pay.
  • Extension of paid paternity leave to a month (currently two weeks).

Liberal Democrats

  • A pledge to ensure public sector workers receive pay rises in line with inflation by ending the 1% pay cap on public sector pay rises.
  • Proposals to scrap Employment Tribunal fees. 
  • Proposals to stop the abuse of zero hours’ contracts by allowing workers the right to request a fixed contract after a set period.
  • A guarantee of the rights of EU nationals living in the UK as well as secure equivalent rights for UK citizens living in EU countries. 
  • Extension of paid paternity leave to a month (currently two weeks).
  • Flexible working and shared parental leave will become a day one right.
  • A 1% rise in income tax.

UKIP

  • Cut net migration levels to zero within 5 years, by banning migration to the UK for all unskilled or low-skilled workers.
  • Increase the income tax threshold to £13,500 and 40% income tax threshold to commence at £55,000.
  • 23 June to be marked as Independence Day and to become a bank holiday.

Green Party

  • Proposals to create a “living wage for all”, aiming for £10 per hour by 2020.
  • Proposals to move towards a 4-day working week.
  • A second Brexit referendum.
  • A guarantee of the rights of EU nationals living in the UK. 

Here at SCE Solicitors, we are employment law specialists and we eagerly await the election results to see what changes may be introductions over the next few years.  If you would like to discuss any employment law issue, please contact us on 01133 50 40 30 or at hello@scesolicitors.co.uk.

The contents of this article are purely a summary of key points of some of the Party’s manifestos which relate to employment law and employment rights and should not be seen as an indication of any party affiliation by SCE Solicitors or any of its employees. 

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SCE Solicitors is a boutique employment law and dispute resolution practice based in Leeds which advises clients nationwide.  Please note that the information in this blog is to provide information of general interest in a summary manner and should not be construed as individual legal advice. Readers should consult with SCE Solicitors or other professional counsel before acting on the information contained here.

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