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Tag Archive

Tips For Tackling Long-Term Sickness Absence

Dealing appropriately with employees on long-term sickness absence from the outset can help achieve an earlier return to work. Where a return is ultimately not possible, it will reduce the prospect of a dispute escalating. These are our top three tips for tackling long-term sickness absence:

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A Guide For Employers: Family Friendly Working

From shared parental leave to part-time working, in this guide we explore five things all employers need to know about family friendly working.

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3 Things We Learnt In Law This Week (7 February 2019)

Consultation On Extending Redundancy Protection For New Parents

A recent study by the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy found that one in nine returning to work after maternity leave were fired, made redundant, or treated in a manner which forced them to leave their job. The study also found that as many as 54,000 women per year are losing their jobs as a result of their pregnancy or maternity leave.

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3 Things We Learnt In Law This Week (31 January 2019)

Employee Was Not Unfairly Dismissed Over Offensive Facebook Posts About Director

An employee’s “extremely derogatory” social media posts about his boss’s generosity in awarding a Christmas bonus did not justify the employer’s failure to give him notice pay when he was dismissed, the Manchester Employment Tribunal has ruled.

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3 Things We Learnt In Law This Week (13 December 2018)

Is veganism a “philosophical belief” that should be protected by law?

An employment tribunal is being asked to decide whether veganism is a “philosophical belief” and therefore, should be protected by law.

The landmark case, which is listed for March 2019, will help determine whether veganism is a “philosophical belief” and therefore, should be legally protected.

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Our All New 5 Step Guide to Reducing Sickness Absence in the Workplace and Preventing Discrimination Claims

Managing sickness absence is a pivotal part of the successful running of your business. Letting sickness absence get out of control can mean that be business is not as productive, or efficient, as it could be. However, mismanagement of sickness absence can lead to a disability discrimination claim which could cost your business thousands of pounds.

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SCE Solicitors Celebrates Manchester Gay Pride

Having lived in Manchester for a long time, I know that Manchester Pride is a huge event for me and the rest of the Manchester LGBT community.  So, to celebrate the upcoming festivities we here at SCE Solicitors celebrated our own diversity with a ‘pride party’. We pride ourselves on being a diverse team, despite our size, and we encourage others to do the same.

Having a diverse workforce is a commercial no-brainer. It allows businesses to use people’s different backgrounds, knowledge, skills and expertise to create an environment where employees can learn from each other and produce innovative ideas. Employees will also feel valued and supported, which increases their productivity. Workplace diversity builds a good reputation for any business. Being known for being fair and diverse is likely to attract a wider pool of applicants for any vacancies and will attract loyalty from the socially conscious.

It also encourages a mutual respect for others, which is vital to protect against claims of discrimination. The Equality Act 2010 protects those who have one or more of the 9 protected characteristics from discrimination. The protected characteristics are; age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation. Even if you, as an employer, do not yourself discriminate against the protected employee, you can still be held liable for an employee’s conduct if you cannot show that you have done everything in your power to prevent such behaviour. Therefore, it is imperative that employers have effective Equal Opportunities and Diversity policies, staff and management training, and a zero-tolerance approach when dealing with acts of discrimination.

If you are an employer or an individual and you have questions about diversity and discrimination in the workplace contact me at eve.king@scesolicitors.co.uk or call 01133 50 40 30.

Manchester Gay Pride begins today, Friday 24 August 2018, and ends on Monday 27 August 2018. 


SCE Solicitors is a boutique employment law practice based in Leeds which advises clients nationwide.  Please note that the information in this blog is to provide information of general interest in a summary manner and should not be construed as individual legal advice. Readers should consult with SCE Solicitors or other professional counsel before acting on the information contained here.

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How to Manage Diversity in the Workplace

Managing diversity in the workplace presents employers with a number of challenges. However, these challenges can be easily managed by employers promoting a culture of tolerance and open communication. Below are our top tips for managing diversity in the workplace.

Treat each employee as an individual

Avoid making assumptions about employees from different backgrounds. Instead, look at each employee as an individual and judge successes and failures on the individual’s merit.

Prioritise communication

To manage a diverse workplace, organisations need to ensure that they effectively communicate with employees. Policies, procedures, safety rules and other important information should be designed to overcome language and cultural barriers by translating materials and using pictures and symbols whenever applicable.

Encourage employees to work in diverse groups

Diverse work teams let employees get to know and value one another on an individual basis and can help break down preconceived notions and cultural misunderstandings.
Base standards on objective criteria

Set one standard of rules for all groups of employees regardless of background. Ensure that all employment actions, including discipline, follow these standardised criteria to make sure each employee is treated the same.

Be open-minded

Recognise, and encourage employees to recognise, that one’s own experience, background, and culture are not the only with value to the organisation. Look for ways to incorporate a diverse range of perspectives and talents into efforts to achieve organisational goals.

Recruitment

To build a diverse workplace, it is crucial to recruit and hire talent from a variety of backgrounds. This requires leadership and others who make hiring decisions to overcome bias in interviewing and assessing talent. If organisations can break through bias and hire the most qualified people, those with the right education, experience and skill sets, a diverse workplace should be the natural result.

Policies and Practices

Organisations that embrace diversity also need to ensure that there are policies and practices in place to protect employees’ rights and stay compliant with government regulations.

Zero-Tolerance Policy

Having a diverse workplace means that jokes and comments about a protected characteristic need to be met with zero-tolerance enforcement. Policies should be put in place to handle misconduct and communicate to employees that this type of behaviour will not be tolerated. Organisations also need to make sure they have a formal complaint policy, so employees know how to report misconduct within an organisation.

Training

Employees need to be aware of how to coexist with a diverse range of people, as well as be conscious of cultural sensitivity. Training can help an organisation manage diversity in the workplace by helping employees become more self-aware, which plays a vital role in helping employees understand their own cultural biases and prejudices.

If you need any help and advice in relation to the above, please do not hesitate to contact me or the employment team on 0113 350 4030 or at hello@scesolicitors.co.uk.

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SCE Solicitors is a boutique employment law practice based in Leeds which advises clients nationwide.  Please note that the information in this blog is to provide information of general interest in a summary manner and should not be construed as individual legal advice. Readers should consult with SCE Solicitors or other professional counsel before acting on the information contained here.