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Tag Archive

3 Things We Learnt In Law This Week (25 April 2019)

National Minimum Wage and Living Wage

Rates increase this month. Make sure you’re up-to-date. The new rates from 1st April 2019 are: 

  • £8.21 per hour for ages 25 and over
  • £7.70 per hour for ages 21 to 24
  • £6.15 per hour for ages 18 to 20
  • £4.35 per hour for school leaving age to 17
  • £3.90 per hour for apprentices
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10 Employment Law Changes for 2019

2018 has been a landmark year for employment law with gender pay gap reporting and widespread claims of workplace sexual harassment dominating the headlines. It looks like 2019 will be just as busy with a number of legal changes on their way. Below we list just ten changes that employers will need to look out for.

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Gig Economy – Royal Mail Group Facing Legal Action From Drivers

The trend towards gig economy drivers and contractors demanding employment status rights will continue throughout 2018. This should come as no surprise when you consider the recent report published by parliamentary committees which determined nearly 1.6 million people work for gig-economy giants and find relatively little protection provided under current employment law due to their status. 

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Worker Rate Changes 2017

Many of us will have been busy enjoying the long Easter break and the last thing that will be on anyone’s mind is whether payroll information relating to hourly rates has been submitted or processed to the relevant department. So we thought we would send everyone a reminder that as of the 1 April 2017 National Minimum Wage (NMW) and Living Wage rates changed. Please make sure that you have updated your payroll so that your workers get paid their legal entitlement. 

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Working Sleepovers and the National Minimum Wage (NMW)

According to virtually any empirical research you would care to read, we are an ageing population. It follows then that the number of individuals engaged in care-based employment will continue to rise alongside the number of elderly and vulnerable people requiring care.

Owing to the demand placed on the time of such workers, staying overnight to care for their charges is a very common practice. It is important then that the legal mechanics of how those in the care industry are paid for unsociable hours are clear, both to the workers themselves and their employers.

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