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Tag Archive

Onboarding new employees during Covid-19

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, many companies have transitioned to a remote workforce. That means companies moving forward with hiring plans will most likely onboard new employees virtually. 

Certain fundamentals of onboarding should remain the same, according to Sally Stetson, principal and co-founder of executive search firm Salveson Stetson Group.

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How to Manage Diversity in the Workplace

Managing diversity in the workplace presents employers with a number of challenges. However, these challenges can be easily managed by employers promoting a culture of tolerance and open communication. Below are our top tips for managing diversity in the workplace.

Treat each employee as an individual

Avoid making assumptions about employees from different backgrounds. Instead, look at each employee as an individual and judge successes and failures on the individual’s merit.

Prioritise communication

To manage a diverse workplace, organisations need to ensure that they effectively communicate with employees. Policies, procedures, safety rules and other important information should be designed to overcome language and cultural barriers by translating materials and using pictures and symbols whenever applicable.

Encourage employees to work in diverse groups

Diverse work teams let employees get to know and value one another on an individual basis and can help break down preconceived notions and cultural misunderstandings.
Base standards on objective criteria

Set one standard of rules for all groups of employees regardless of background. Ensure that all employment actions, including discipline, follow these standardised criteria to make sure each employee is treated the same.

Be open-minded

Recognise, and encourage employees to recognise, that one’s own experience, background, and culture are not the only with value to the organisation. Look for ways to incorporate a diverse range of perspectives and talents into efforts to achieve organisational goals.

Recruitment

To build a diverse workplace, it is crucial to recruit and hire talent from a variety of backgrounds. This requires leadership and others who make hiring decisions to overcome bias in interviewing and assessing talent. If organisations can break through bias and hire the most qualified people, those with the right education, experience and skill sets, a diverse workplace should be the natural result.

Policies and Practices

Organisations that embrace diversity also need to ensure that there are policies and practices in place to protect employees’ rights and stay compliant with government regulations.

Zero-Tolerance Policy

Having a diverse workplace means that jokes and comments about a protected characteristic need to be met with zero-tolerance enforcement. Policies should be put in place to handle misconduct and communicate to employees that this type of behaviour will not be tolerated. Organisations also need to make sure they have a formal complaint policy, so employees know how to report misconduct within an organisation.

Training

Employees need to be aware of how to coexist with a diverse range of people, as well as be conscious of cultural sensitivity. Training can help an organisation manage diversity in the workplace by helping employees become more self-aware, which plays a vital role in helping employees understand their own cultural biases and prejudices.

If you need any help and advice in relation to the above, please do not hesitate to contact me or the employment team on 0113 350 4030 or at hello@scesolicitors.co.uk.

If you would like to be kept up to date with any changes in employment or dispute resolution law, please subscribe to our newsletter.

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SCE Solicitors is a boutique employment law practice based in Leeds which advises clients nationwide.  Please note that the information in this blog is to provide information of general interest in a summary manner and should not be construed as individual legal advice. Readers should consult with SCE Solicitors or other professional counsel before acting on the information contained here.

How will GDPR impact your recruitment process?

The General Data Protection Regulations (“GDPR”) is a new set of European regulations that will overhaul existing Data Protection laws and come into force on 25th May 2018

The regulations are going to have far reaching consequences for how business look after their personal data, and to enforce these new regulations GDPR will also allow for significant fines for companies who breach these new rules.

Recruiters especially should make sure that they are transparent when processing candidate data during hiring. They should also ensure candidates can exercise their rights under GDPR.

When sourcing CVs

When asking candidates to send in CVs, you’re asking for personal information. Whether this is via a job board, an employment website, or directly via an email, you need to provide information on how the data will be processed (or used), how long it will be retained for, and if the data they shared with you will be transferred overseas (if, for example, you have multiple offices).

You will also be required to provide more information around how an individual can determine if you hold data on them, how they can check what this, how they can rectify the data it if is incomplete or wrong, and how they can enact their ‘right to be forgotten’. 

Security for CVs

Once you have received the CV, you will need to ensure you have a secure process that covers the storage of electronic documents with personal information. This may be in the form of recruitment or HR software, or in password protected files. You will also want to review who is able to access these, and for how long they are kept.

You should also be reviewing your document management systems. Agencies may make you agree to destroy copies of CVs or personal data, but the individual who sent in the CV may also make requests to find out what data you hold on them and amend or remove their data from your system. 

Erased, rectified, restricted or not processed

Under GDPR workers will have extended rights so, in addition to a right to inspect personal data held about them, workers may be able to insist their data is erased, rectified, restricted or not processed at all. Combined with a much tougher enforcement and penalty regime for non-compliance, businesses who ignore GDPR tread a very thin line. 

By understanding more about how GDPR will impact your business, you can negate any negative impact, and help potential employees reap the benefits of feeling more secure when they give their personal data to your company.

If you need help and advice regarding GDPR, please do not hesitate to contact me or the employment team on 0113 350 4030 or at hello@scesolicitors.co.uk.

If you would like to be kept up to date with employment law and dispute resolution updates, please subscribe to our monthly newsletter.


SCE Solicitors is a boutique employment law and dispute resolution practice based in Leeds which advises clients nationwide.  Please note that the information in this blog is to provide information of general interest in a summary manner and should not be construed as individual legal advice. Readers should consult with SCE Solicitors or other professional counsel before acting on the information contained here.

Huge sum for getting your recruitment wrong!

It is a well-established principle that employers are vicariously liable for the conduct of their employees. However does this mean that compensation can be apportioned between the employer and the individual responsible for the discriminatory acts?

The Court of Appeal (CA) has recently provided us with some clarity on the issue in London Borough of Hackney v Sivanandan & Ors.

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Employer versus trade union

In many industries the battle of wills between employers and trade union officials can become difficult to maintain. A question which frequently arises for employers is whether they can refuse to be dictated to about whom to employ without breaking trade union discrimination laws.

The EAT recently dealt with this issue in the case of Miller v Interserve Industrial Services Ltd.

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