Title

Autem vel eum iriure dolor in hendrerit in vulputate velit esse molestie consequat, vel illum dolore eu feugiat nulla facilisis at vero eros et dolore feugait

Tag Archive

Social Media and Social Networking in the Workplace

As social media expands into every aspect of our lives, including the workplace, striking a balance between leveraging social media as a business tool and managing its use by individual employees can be challenging. As more people become social media savvy, concerns over the impact of social media in the workplace are not diminishing over time.

So, what would a happy medium be for employers? Let’s see… 

Read More

Social Media Gone Mad

As an employment lawyer, it seems like I can’t get through one week without seeing at least one news story on the use, or more accurately misuse, of social media by employees.  This week’s news reported that Coronation Street actor Marc Anwar had been dismissed, allegedly for his activity on Twitter.  Here I take a look at this story in more detail and advise what preventative measures employers should be taking to minimise misuse.

Read More

5 legal issues that will scare employers this Halloween

It is no surprise that Halloween is one of the holidays that your employees enjoy celebrating in the workplace. Celebrations range from trick or treating, pumpkin carving contests, adult costume contests to parties with alcohol. For employees’ they all encourage interaction and workplace engagement but for employers’ they all open the door for potential liabilities and concerns. So what are the 5 top legal issues that employers need to be aware of to avoid the scare this Halloween?

Read More

Managing your social media: Employee LinkedIn accounts

In the last day or so a furore has erupted following the now much publicised incident between a 27 year-old female Barrister, Charlotte Proudman, and Alexander Carter-Silk, a 57-year old Senior Partner at City firm Brown Rudnick,.

For those that have somehow avoided this now quite viral story, Miss Proudman sought to connect with Mr Carter-Silk via the ubiquitous business networking site ‘Linkedin’. Mr Carter-Silk upon accepting this request to connect, passed comment on Miss Proudman’s profile picture stating that it was ‘stunning’ and that she would ‘win the prize for the best Linkedin picture I have seen’.

Read More

The posts that can cost the most: Facebook and Gross Misconduct

By this point, some eight years after it became a household name, we are all more or less au fait with the ubiquitous ‘Facebook’; it is indispensable for many, inescapable for some. 

It seems however that the legal ramifications for employees making derogatory statements about their employers has still to yet fully sink in. While many users of the app may think that they are posting to a limited audience, it does of course have the capability to make such posts go much further and become the equivalent of taking out a full page advert in a national newspaper.

Read More

Avoiding a tribunal claim: Managing social media

Social media is everywhere these days, be it at home, on the train and of course very often in the workplace.

The key platforms as you will no doubt be aware are Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. The personal nature of these pages allow the user to share news, gossip, photo and video, no matter how inane or mundane. A profile can be restricted to being seen by family and friends, or alternatively be open to the general public.

Many professionals view social media as a tool to be utilised for progression of their professional goals, this in particular relates to LinkedIn. However problems can arise for employers where individuals make comments on their personal pages in the mistaken belief that no one from work will see them. The consequences for such mistakes can range from the relatively mild to the outright catastrophic.

Read More

A Tweet Too Far: Twitter and Unfair Dismissal

Catching up with one of the more interesting and highly pertinent cases reported just before the festive break, we consider this week the growing amount of social media related gross misconduct dismissals. Clearly such dismissals will only be set to increase over the coming years, parallel to use of social media itself, so this really is an area where having some knowledge of the current case law landscape will be increasingly invaluable to both employers and employees.

Read More

Managing Social Media Professionally

Social media is everywhere these days, be it at home, on the train and of course very often in the workplace.

The key platforms as you will no doubt be aware are Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. The personal nature of these pages allow the user to share news, gossip, photo and video, no matter how inane or mundane. A profile can be restricted to being seen by family and friends, or alternatively be open to the general public.

Read More

Facebook comments several weeks apart can amount to a continuing act!

Facebook is a social media forum which has over a billion members; therefore the odds of employees nothaving an account are slim. Hence over the last couple of years we have seen a rise in allegations of discrimination arising from comments made on Facebook (as well as other social media forums).

The general time limit for bringing a discrimination complaint to the employment tribunal is three months from the date of the last discriminatory act. However for the purposes of discrimination when do social media comments amount to being a continuing act?

Read More