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Tag Archive

The Do’s and Don’ts When Handling A Bullying Grievance

Allegations of workplace bullying are difficult for an employer to deal with because bullying can be hard to recognise and define. In this article we look at how employers can best handle a bullying grievance.

What does someone mean when they say they are “being bullied”? It’s something which is very much in the eye of the beholder – one person’s robust management style is another’s bullying, and the employer faces the unenviable task of adjudicating where the line between acceptable and unacceptable behaviour lies. While most people will agree what constitutes bullying in extreme cases, there is a grey area in the middle which may cause more debate.

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Criminal Offences Committed Outside Work – What Should an Employer Do?

What position should an employer take regarding an employee who has committed a criminal offence outside of work? 

We are all aware that, when someone is charged with a criminal offence, they are innocent until proven guilty.  Any dismissal will be unfair unless it is for one of the statutory fair reasons and as employer you act reasonably in all the circumstances.  

If an employee is convicted of a criminal offence occurring outside work, a dismissal is only likely to be fair if that criminal offence has some material impact on the employee’s ability or suitability to do their job or affects their acceptability to other employees to a material extent.

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3 Things We Learnt In Law This Week (3 January 2019)

UK Government Annouces New Code Of Practice To Tackle Workplace Sexual Harassment 

A new statutory Code of Practice will be developed by the Equality and Human Rights Commission in order to guide employers on their legal responsibilities regarding sexual harassment in the workplace. This was one of 12 actions recently announced by the UK government as it makes confronting workplace harassment a priority.

The announcements are in response to the July 2018 recommendations of the UK Women and Equalities Committee, which called for (1) putting sexual harassment at the top of the UK government’s agenda; (2) requiring regulators to take a more active role in tackling harassment; (3) making enforcement processes work better for employees by setting them out in the Code; (4) cleaning up the use of nondisclosure agreements (NDAs) used in employment contracts and settlement agreements; and (5) collecting robust data on sexual harassment in the workplace at regular intervals.

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10 Employment Law Changes for 2019

2018 has been a landmark year for employment law with gender pay gap reporting and widespread claims of workplace sexual harassment dominating the headlines. It looks like 2019 will be just as busy with a number of legal changes on their way. Below we list just ten changes that employers will need to look out for.

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3 Things We Learnt In Law This Week (13 December 2018)

Is veganism a “philosophical belief” that should be protected by law?

An employment tribunal is being asked to decide whether veganism is a “philosophical belief” and therefore, should be protected by law.

The landmark case, which is listed for March 2019, will help determine whether veganism is a “philosophical belief” and therefore, should be legally protected.

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What To Do When An Employee On Maternity Leave Wants To Go Part-Time?

A full-time employee on maternity leave has requested to return part-time. How do you handle the situation and what are the risks if you refuse?

Remember that all eligible employees can make a flexible working request. The right is not limited only to parents and carers. However, requests from employees on maternity leave will need to be treated carefully because of the risk of a sex discrimination claim.

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When is it Possible to Dismiss an Employee for Gross Misconduct?

Gross misconduct is misconduct so serious as to justify the immediate dismissal of an employee. Certain acts, such as theft, fraud, physical violence or serious negligence would almost always be gross misconduct.

Employers must always take into account the nature of their business and the circumstances surrounding the misconduct before any decision to dismiss is made. What is deemed to be gross misconduct in one industry may not be in another. For example, regularly using offensive language may be treated differently in different sectors and working environments.

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